Academics

  • Blocking and looping of all Grade 6 & 7 Language Arts and Social Studies classes
  • classroom
  • Foreign Languages: French, Japanese, and Spanish (I and II)
  • Full-year Science or Science/Health for grades 6,7, & 8
  • Integrated Library and Technology Center
  • Integrated Mathematics (I, II, and III)
  • Reading Instruction for all grade 6,7, & 8 students who are not in all-year Music and Foreign Language
  • Bilingual/ELL Program
  • Advanced Learning Opportunities – APP and Spectrum
  • Special Education Services (Levels 2-4)
  • Award winning Art Program
  • Award winning Concert Bands, String Orchestras, Choirs, Jazz Band, and Fiddle Group
  • Award winning Math Counts Team

Language Arts

At the sixth, seventh and eighth grade level, the curriculum varies by program.  The core curriculum topics remain static according to best practices. The following areas of content are covered at each level: Vocabulary, Writing, Grammar and Usage, Literary Analysis and Reading/Literature. Each skill set is described by grade level.

As part of the Balanced Literacy program, many of our teachers use a workshop approach to reading and writing that is grounded in research from Columbia University’s Teachers College Reading and Writing Project. A workshop approach follows the premise that to grow as a reader and writer, a student needs to be spending as much time as possible reading and writing. Daily lessons taught by the teacher focus on strategies that advance this progress. You may find your child’s experience in reading and writing classes (Language Arts at the middle school) different than your experience in school. The greatest differences will be in the length of the lesson presented by the teacher, the amount of choice in independent reading selection, and the amount of reading and writing that is expected from students. Another difference will be in the feedback your child receives, which comes through conferences with the teacher and through an assessment tool called a rubric. The feedback is given frequently and in the case of writing, will be prior to a piece of work being submitted for a final grade.

Reading
Reading is an interactive process between a reader and text. In constructing meaning, the reader combines knowledge of phonics, structure of language, and meaning of words. In addition, the reader's prior experience and knowledge are critical to the process. Reading is developmental in nature and complex; it requires learning the relationship between spoken and written language. The process of learning to read varies with each child. Literate individuals must have the tool of reading in order to continue to acquire knowledge. They will use that tool throughout their life to learn, explore, and to understand the world.

A variety of instructional strategies make up a comprehensive, balanced approach to literacy. In order to be truly literate, students must develop skills and strategies in both reading and writing. The student's progress is measured in several ways: using classroom assessments that are rooted in Common Core State Standards recently adopted by Washington State, using district standards linked to the CCSS and measured by the MAP Reading Test twice each year, and by the MSP administered each spring. The District believes it is critical to engage parents and community in literacy and WMS puts on an annual family celebration of Language Arts called WALApalooza.

Key Components to Readers Workshop are:

  • Mini-Lessons for developing Reading Skills
  • Read-Alouds to demonstrate Reading Strategies
  • Independent Reading Time
  • Partner Talk about books and texts
  • Journal Writing and Reflection
  • On-going Assessment based on National Standards
  • Goal Setting and Planning for Growth

Writing
Writing is developmental in nature and a complex skill, and learning to write varies with each child. A writer combines knowledge of phonics, the structure of language, and meaning of words. In addition, the writer's prior experience and knowledge are critical to the process, in order to synthesize information and communicate with others. Students have the opportunity to write on a variety of topics, and for many audiences and purposes during their school career. They will use the skills they learn throughout their life to explain, to create, and to communicate in the world.

In order to be literate, students must be skilled in both reading and writing. The student's achievement is measured by Seattle Public Schools' academic standards and the grade level benchmarks. The involvement in and demonstration of writing by parents and community are essential with good models and instruction. All students will become successful writers as they practice and develop their skills.

The key components to Writers' Workshop are:

  • Mini-Lessons for developing Writing Skills
  • Demonstrations using Mentor Texts
  • Independent Writing Time
  • Writing Partner Work, such as exchanging ideas, encouragement, and peer editing
  • Monthly Publishing Deadlines
  • Journal Writing and Reflection
  • Goal Setting and Planning for Growth 

Sixth Grade

Vocabulary: Vocabulary programs vary. Please see individual instructors for specific details.

Writing: The writing traits are introduced with a focus on conventions, content and ideas, and organization.   Specific instruction in the writing process sets the focus on pre-writing methods and revision. Modes of writing include narrative, fiction, informational / expository essay, persuasive essay, argument essay, and research-based argument essay. Writing concepts focus on types of paragraphs, paragraph structure, topic sentence and support, subject and theme, and the five paragraph essay.  

Literary Analysis:  Techniques of literary analysis are introduced. These may include denotation and connotation, simile and metaphor, personification, point of view, fact vs. opinion, and pro versus con, theme, structure, figurative language, and onomatopoeia.

Grammar and Usage: The focus of the sixth grade grammar is identifying and using parts of speech, types of sentences, as well as a review of simple subject & predicate.

Reading: Students read a variety of books (fiction, non-fiction, biography, auto-biography) depending on level, program and instructor.  Please see individual instructors for reading lists specific to your child. 


Seventh Grade

Vocabulary: Vocabulary programs vary. Please see individual instructors for specific details. 

Writing: The writing traits guide instruction. Reviews of conventions, content and ideas, and organization, are followed by sentence fluency, word choice and voice. Specific instruction in the writing process continues with a focus on the five paragraph essay and an introduction to research format. Within the MLA format, instruction includes thesis statements, claim/support/commentary, reliability of sources, and identifying audience...

Literary Analysis: Instruction focuses on structure, tone, mood, imagery, metaphor, personification, alliteration and various other literary devices.

Grammar and Usage: The focus of the seventh grade grammar instruction is sentence structure, internal punctuation, and subject/verb agreement.

Reading:  Students will read a variety of books (fiction, non-fiction, biography, auto-biography) depending on level, program and instructor.  Please see individual instructors for reading lists specific to your child.


Eighth Grade 

Vocabulary:  Vocabulary programs vary. Please see individual instructors for specific details.

Writing: A continuing focus on the writing traits and the writing process is taught with specific attention to teaching word choice and voice. Writing modes include narrative, persuasive, descriptive and expository forms. Essay writing and research writing, in MLA format, are emphasized in the eighth grade.

Literary Analysis: Skills and strategies identified in the eighth grade include, but are not limited to, point of view, tone, syntax, imagery, irony, inference, and logical fallacies. 

Grammar and Usage:  At the eighth grade level, instruction focuses on more complex grammar concepts and skills.

Reading:  Students will read a variety of books (fiction, non-fiction, biography, auto-biography) depending on level, program and instructor.  Please see individual instructors for reading lists specific to your child.

Questions about Language Arts at WMS can be addressed to Rob Rose-Leigh, Department Chair roroseleigh@seattleschools.org


Reading

6th Grade:
Reading 6 – Students read independently, in groups, as a class and with interactive read aloud to develop higher level thinking skills such as analysis, synthesis, inference, summary and point of view. Students are assessed in the fall and provided with instruction to meet their academic needs to become proficient and motivated readers. Students are taught a variety of strategies using novels, non-fiction literature, poetry and reader’s theater.

Reading 6 Honors - This class is a half year class, which focuses on literature analysis.  Topics may include:  The elements of dramatic structure, genre studies, and work in fictionand non-fiction integrated with reading skills and strategies.

7th and 8th grade Reading Improvement:
Using a balanced curriculum of independent reading at the “just right” level, guided reading, shared reading and interactive read aloud, students receive additional instruction on skills and strategies based on the academic standards to become proficient readers through practice with fiction and non-fiction text.  Students are formally assessed four times a year to monitor progress and respond orally and/or in a journal to what they read.  Starting fall 2011, reading improvement classes have implemented Read 180which is a comprehensive system of curriculum, instruction, assessment and professional development proven to raise reading achievement for struggling readers in Grades 4-12+.  Read 180 is designed to maximize student engagement, teacher effectiveness, and leader empowerment.

Questions about Reading at WMS can be addressed to Melanie Olson, Reading Department Chair – miolson@seattleschools.org

This page last modified: January 2013 


Math

The goals of the Washington Middle School Math Department are:

  1. To allow students to progress through the curriculum based on mastery rather than grade level or program.
  2. To prepare every student to meet the challenges of Algebra 1 or a more advanced math course by the time they enter 9th grade.
  3. To close the mathematics achievement gap between majority students and students of color.
  4. To challenge every child and to provide extra support to those who need it.

To meet these goals, Washington offers a spiraling math sequence using the Connected Math Project 2 as our primary text resource. The classes offered at Washington are Math 6, Math 7, and Math 8, plus the high school level courses Algebra I and Geometry.

Students who are new to Washington are placed based on their previous coursework, their winter MAP scores, sending teacher recommendation and parent input.  Details of this process can be found at the seattleschools.org website under the Math Pathways information.  Students who are not new to Washington are placed by teacher recommendation based on their performance in their math classes and advance through the sequence based on mastery.

Questions about the Math program at WMS can be addressed to Kurt Cohrs, Math Department chair – kgcohrs@seattleschools.org


Science

At each grade, our goal is to produce a scientifically literate student, who understands basic science concepts, how to use the scientific method to solve problems and how scientists work. Our Science teachers use the hands-on inquiry approach with our students.  Students take Science each year at Washington Middle School. At each grade level, FLASH(Family Life and Sexual Health) and HIV/AIDS is taught, as part of the Science curriculum.

Seattle School District currently uses hands-on science kits for middle school Science curriculum.  Each grade level is assigned integrated Science concepts to be taught using “hands-on” kit-based activities.  Teachers enrich our Science curriculum by adding current science events, projects and research activities to their grade level Science Program.  At this time the science topics for each grade level Seattle School District Science Kits are pre-selected for middle schools.

Seattle School District Science Kits for 6th Grade:
Major units of study are Solutions and PollutionDiversity of Life, Magnets and Motors, and Truth about Science, which is an inquiry-based approach that teaches the Science processes & skills using the Scientific method.  This is also the model that is used to teach the requirements for the SPS District Middle School Science Fair.  to mandate participation in the District’s Middle School Science Fair.  FLASH (Family Life and Sexual Health) and HIV/AIDS will be taught as part of Science.

APP Science 6
Major units of study are:  Human Body Systems, Biotechnology and Labs including outside speakers/presentations.  In addition to the SPS kits, we will use the UWEB and Youth Take Heart materials.  Earth in Space and Catastrophic Events will also be covered.  Additionally, all students will participate in the annual WMS/SPS Science Fair.

Seattle School District Science Kits for 7th Grade:
Major units of study are Human Body Systems: Structure & Function; Cell Processes and Diseases; Youth Take Heart Kit; UWEB Biotechnology Kits and Catastrophic Events.  

Physical Science 7th/8th grade**
Physical Science is a year-long course.  This class will be a project-based, hands-on course in which students will use their knowledge of the scientific method to investigate the physical world in which we live; specifically the interactions of nonliving systems through the study of forces, motion, matter, energy, Earth systems, and evolution of the Universe.  Students will also learn the engineering design process and use this method to practice collecting and analyzing data to support their learning of physical science concepts while solving "real world" type problems.  Topics to be covered include types of energy and transformations, force and motion including Newton's Laws, simple machines, fluid mechanics, heat and temperature, chemistry (i.e. matter, physical changes of matter, chemical changes of matter, small particle theory of phases, atomic strucure, and chemical reactions), a review of Earth systems (geology and weather), and astronomy beyond our solar system.  During the year, students will choose one science, engineering, or technology-based competition to enter individually or as a team.  Most of this project will be conducted outside of class giving students a chance to research, investigate, and solve a variety of community and environmental problems.  The type of project submitted and team size will depend on the competition chosen.  

Seattle School District Science Kits for 8th Grade:
Major units of study are Properties of Matter, Ecology and Evolution, Earth in Space. FLASH (Family Life and Sexual Health) and HIV/AIDS will be taught as part of Science. The Science WASL has been replaced by the Science MSP.  The 8th grade MSP (middle school proficiency) exam in Science is given during spring quarter.  Science inquiry skills and activities to prepare students for the MSP (middle school proficiency) are embedded throughout the Science curriculum at each grade level.

Biology 8th grade**
Biology is a year-long course that is centered on the science of living organisms and how they interact with their environment.  The biology curriculum is guided by the Washington state science standards. Students study the structure and function of cells, matter and energy, continuity, genetics, biotechnology, evolution and ecology.  Students complete multiple projects to improve their understanding of systems, inquiry, and biology content.  Students also participate in a science, engineering, or technology-based competition and display their work at the WMS Science Fair.  The prerequisite knowledge gained in physical science is important for understanding the complex processes of biology.  Students in biology have the opportunity to earn high school credit and take the Biology End of Course (EOC) exam which is now a requirement for students to graduate from high school.

**Physical Science and Biology are required APP Science classes.  For non-APP students concurrent assignment to Algebra or Geometry is necessary for participation in these classes.

Questions about Science at WMS can be addressed to Jim Vigil, Science Department Chair – javigil@seattleschools.org

This page last modified: January 2013 


Social Studies

This is a basic outline of the courses offered at Washington Middle School in the area of Social Studies. In all programs, the majority of 6th and 7th grade students are blocked with the same Language Arts and Social Studies instructor for two years.

Social Studies at the 6th grade level Regular and Spectrum programs is a full year course focused on the study of Ancient Civilizations. The textbook The World and Its People by Silver, Burdett and Ginn is used. The interplay between history, culture, and geography are explored through a variety of perspectives. Students will develop skills related to the work of geographers and historians such as utilizing cartography, and examining primary sources. In all, this is a very full year for the 6th grade.

The curriculum for the 7th grade Regular and Spectrum programs is targeted on the history of the United States up to the American Civil War. The text for this course is The American Nation: Beginnings—1877 by Prentice Hall. This 7th grade course is a study of United States history and government. Documents such as the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution serve as reference points for basic principles upon which political, economic, and social decisions are made in our society. Students will examine important themes such as colonialism, federalism, expansionism, industrialism, and individualism. Vocabulary, geography, mapping, charting, and research and organization skills are emphasized. Students should finish the 7th grade with a solid understanding of the origins of the country.

World Geography is one half of the focus of study in 8th grade Regular and Spectrum programs, along with the study of Pacific Northwest History. Some classes use the Glencoe text on World Geography or the Prentice Hall text on Cultural Geography. The TCI text, Geography Alive, is also used. Many classes focus on current events as part of a geographic understanding of the world; therefore, current newspapers and resources from the internet are used in lieu of a textbook.  World Geography is an 8th grade course designed to explore physical, human, and applied geographic skills and knowledge.  Various approaches to geography are included with a major focus on human geography and the relationship with the natural environment.  Emphasis is on the importance of globes, maps, and atlases as basic tools in the study of geography, and the interrelationship between the world's people and Earth's natural environment.

Pacific Northwest History (Washington State History) is a requirement for graduation from high school, but this requirement is met in the eighth grade.  This study explores links between historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and geographic aspects of the Pacific Northwest, the nation, and the world at large.  Students use Washington - A State of Contrasts, by Lambert and Clark, the school district's recently adopted text with additional resources found in either the Pelz textbook - Washington State History, or Pacific Northwest History, by Lambert.  Time is also allotted to the study of the state's natural resources, agriculture, manufacturing, energy, trade, recreation, and tourism.  Special emphasis is placed on the importance of responsible citizenship to future growth and stability in Washington State.

In the sixth and seventh grades, students in APP study geography, world history, and the humanities from ancient through medieval times.  In the sixth grade, the year is focused on origins and the "Cradles of Civilization" (Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, and China).  In seventh grade, students' focus of study is on Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Age of Exploration.  The pedagogical approach is interdisciplinary; focused on abstract concepts such as systems, cause and effect, and how things change over time; centered on higher order reasoning; utilizes primary sources for historical analysis; includes in-depth study of content; and employs the skills of discussion, writing, and research.

The eighth grade studies World Geography and Washington State History at a rapid pace during the first semester.  The key areas covered in the Spectrum and Regular programs are covered here as well to satisfy the requirements for the Washington State History credit.  In addition, physical geology is explored through modern cultural and social movements in geography.  United States history is considered concurrently, and interspersed with Washington State history during first semester and continued into second semester.  the main emphasis of the second semester is "Foundations of World History" which is a curriculum based on prerequisite work taken by high school freshmen at schools offering AP World History in the sophomore year.  This course is accepted in lieu of the prerequisite and allows APP students to elect to take AP World History in their freshman year.

Questions about Social Studies at WMS can be addressed to Laura Lehni, Department Chair - lllehni@seattleschools.org

This page last modified: January 2013


Art and Technology

Beginning Visual Art 7
This is a semester exploratory art class designed to introduce students to the elements of art and principles of design.  In this class we will use a range of methods and materials to create a body of work based on modern and traditional techniques.  Students will create drawings, paintings, pottery and sculptures, collages, and other multimedia art.

Intermediate Visual Art 8
This class is an elective for students who have some art experience and who are interested in improving their technical skills and creating high quality pieces of art.  Projects in this class will focus on using color, shape, line, texture, contrast, emphasis, balance, and repetition to create art that says something about youth experience and culture.  Students will explore ways in which art can be used as a communication tool to reflect emotional content, personal opinion and to influence the larger community.

Questions about Art at WMS can be addressed to Stephanie Jungblom – Art Teacher - stjungblom@seattleschools.org

Technology 1 & 2
Course for 6th graders:
This course is offered to 6th graders for one academic semester.  Tech 1 provides students with an opportunity to learn the basics of several different computer applications through project based learning.  Students will explore CAD (computer aided design),Rhino(three dimensional solid modeling), GIMP (graphic image manipulation), Photo Story (digital animation), and other software applications.

Course for 8th Graders:
This course is for 8th graders who would like to learn the basics of computer applications through hands-on independent learning and group challenges.  Students will learn the fundamentals of digital photography as well as CAD (computer aided design) with the semester being divided between these two disciplines.  In addition to the above, time will be devoted to the proper use of the internet as a research tool.

Questions about Technology at WMS can be addressed to Kjell - Jon Rye – Technology Teacher - kjrye@seattleschools.org

This page last modified: January 2013


Physical Education

6th, 7th, and 8th Grades:
We believe that every student shall be physically educated; they shall develop the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a variety of physical activities, maintain physical fitness, regularly participate and understand the short-term and long-term benefits of physical activity, and value and enjoy it as an ongoing part of a healthful lifestyle.

The goals in physical education are to provide the student with a wide variety of activities to participate in, to encourage students to strive for their personal best, to foster cooperation, to encourage individual and team responsibility, and to enhance self-esteem through success-oriented, life long activities. We offer various activities (units) including but not limited to volleyball, weightlifting/conditioning, circus arts, inline skating, aerobics, lacrosse, softball, fencing, wrestling, and floor hockey.

Questions about Physical Education at WMS can be addressed to Anna Rabel – PE Teacher - aerabel@seattleschools.org


Music

Beginning Band

Instruction in woodwind, brass and percussion instrumental music for those with little or no previous experience. This group may collaborate with the Beginning Strings class for a “full orchestra” experience in the spring. This group performs in the school’s winter and spring concert. Class meets daily and no audition is required.

Intermediate Band
Instruction in concert band music for those with at least one year of experience on their chosen instrument. Class meets daily and includes basic instrumental instruction, tuning and rehearsal discipline. This class may collaborate with the Intermediate Orchestra class for a “full orchestra” experience in the spring. This group performs in the school’s winter and spring concerts. Admission is by audition in the spring of the previous year with Mrs. Barr Clingan.

Junior Band
Transitional instruction in concert-band music. Students will work on tuning, rhythm, tone, and performance discipline. This group will collaborate with Junior Orchestra for a “full orchestra” experience throughout the school year. This group performs in the school’s winter and spring concerts. This band may enter a regional competition in the spring. Admission is by audition in the spring with Ms. Barr Clingan. Class meets daily.

Senior Band
Advanced instruction for those with requisite skills and training. Students learn and perform a variety of challenging concert-band music. This group will collaborate with Senior Orchestra for a “full orchestra” experience throughout the year. This group performs in the school’s winter and spring concerts. This band may enter a national competition in the spring at an estimated cost of approximately $700 per student (scholarships available). Admission is by audition in the spring with Ms. Barr Clingan. Class meets daily.

Junior Jazz Band (after-school group)
Transitional instruction in jazz. Group meets twice a week during the school year. This group performs in the school’s winter and spring concert. Admission by audition.

Senior Jazz Band
Advanced instruction in jazz performance, including improvisation. Class meets daily. This group requires a significant time commitment. The band competes in at least two regional and three national festivals throughout the year, participates in WMS music events and are invited to play at many community events. Estimated cost for travel is $1,200 per student (includes cost of senior band trip, scholarships available). Admission by audition.

Questions about Band at WMS can be addressed to Ms. Barr Clingan at kjbarrclinga@seattleschools.org. Auditions are held in the spring each year – contact the main office for information.

Beginning Strings
Instruction on bowed stringed instruments (violin, viola, cello, bass) and harp for those with little or no previous experience. This group may collaborate with the Beginning Instruments class for a “full orchestra” experience in the spring. This group performs in the school’s winter and spring concert. Class meets daily and no audition is required. 

Intermediate Orchestra
Instruction in basic string ensemble music for those with at least one year of experience on their chosen stringed instrument. Class meets daily and includes basic instrumental instruction, tuning, and rehearsal discipline. This class may collaborate with the Intermediate Band class for a “full orchestra” experience in the spring. This group performs in the school’s winter and spring concerts. Admission is by audition in the spring of the previous year with Mrs. Fortune.

Junior Orchestra
Transitional instruction in orchestral music. Students will work on tuning, rhythm, tone, and performance discipline. Students will also collaborate with Jr. Band in the preparation of music for Full Orchestra. This group performs in the school’s winter and spring concerts. This class may participate in a regional competition in the spring. Admission is by audition in the spring with Mrs. Fortune. Class meets daily.

Senior Orchestra
Advanced instruction for those with requisite skills and training. Students learn and perform a variety of challenging Full and String Orchestra music. This group will collaborate with Sr. Band throughout the year. This group performs in the school’s winter and spring concerts and at various regional competitions/ festivals. This ensemble may enter a national competition in the spring at an estimated cost of approximately $700 per student (scholarships available). Admission is by audition in the spring with Mrs. Fortune. Class meets daily.

Junior Fiddlers (After-school group)
Transitional instruction in American Roots music for stringed instruments. Group meets 1-2 times per week during the school year. This group performs at the school’s winter and spring concerts. Admission is by audition.

Senior Fiddlers
Advanced instruction in American Roots music for stringed instruments, including improvisation. Class meets daily. This group requires a significant time commitment. The ensemble may compete in regional and national festivals throughout the year, participates in WMS music events and are invited to play at many community events. Estimated cost for travel is $1,200 per student (includes cost of senior trip, scholarships available). Admission by audition.

Junior Choir
The WMS Junior Choir is a non-auditioned ensemble and is open to students in all grades. A range of different musical skills will be covered including note reading, rhythmic and melodic dictation, and sight singing. Students will prepare a diverse repertoire for performance at both the winter and spring concerts, and possibly a regional field trip, or collaboration with singers from other schools. Class meets daily.

Senior Choir
The WMS Senior Choir is an audition-only choir that is open to students in all grades. A range of different advanced musical skills and musical styles will be covered including music theory, diction, and sight singing. Students will prepare a diverse repertoire for performance at the winter and spring concerts. This ensemble may enter a national competition in the spring at an estimated cost of approximately $700 per student (scholarships available).

Questions about Orchestra at WMS can be addressed to Ms. Fortune, eafortune@seattleschools.org. Questions about Choir at WMS can be addressed to Mr. Saunders, bbsaunders@seattleschools.org. Auditions are held in the spring each year – contact the main office for information.

This page last modified: January, 2013


Foreign Language

Spanish I or Spanish 1A– 7th Grade Priority
The primary goal of this class is to establish basic conversational ability in the material covered in class. This includes sports, hobbies, the school day, outings, the telephone and the family. Class time frequently features activity-oriented practice and dramatization of the material. The student is exposed to reading and writing skills as well. The textbook used is Adelante, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Inc. This is the first year of a two-year course for which .5 high school credit is available. Passing grades are required to continue to the next year.

Spanish II or Spanish 1B
Taught immersion-style, students are encouraged to think and respond creatively with language that reflects their real worlds.  At the same time, the worlds of others  are explored through the literature of Matute and García Márquez, through the lens of  exquisite films and accompanied by the sounds of world music.  There is also an emphasis on current events in the Spanish-speaking world.  The course follows the Ven Conmigo (Holt, Rinehart and Winston) series, but expands to include more advanced grammar and vocabulary. This is the second year of a two-year course for which .5 high school credit is available. Students completing Spanish 1A and 1B with passing grades will be eligible to continue on in high school with Spanish 2A.

Japanese I or Japanese 1A - 7th Grade Priority
This class is a continuation and expansion in the functional use of Japanese. Students are expected to master the second of the basic writing systems: Katakana. The progressive and plain forms of verbs, conjugation of adjectives, as well as basic Kanji (Chinese characters) will be covered. The second half of Adventures in Japanese I, Peterson & Omizo will be covered up to chapter 13. This is the second year of a two-year course for which .5 high school credit is available. Students completing Japanese 1A and 1B with passing grades will be eligible to continue on in high school with Japanese 2A.

Japanese II or Japanese 1B
This class is a continuation and expansion in the functional use of Japanese. Students are expected to master the second of the basic writing systems: Katakana. The progressive and plain forms of verbs, conjugation of adjectives, as well as basic Kanji (Chinese characters) will be covered. The second half of Adventures in Japanese I, Peterson & Omizo will be covered up to chapter 13. This is the second year of a two-year course for which .5 high school credit is available. Students completing Japanese 1A and 1B with passing grades will be eligible to continue on in high school with Japanese 2A.French 

French I – 7th Grade Priority
The primary goal of this class is to master basic French grammar and vocabulary as a foundation for comprehension and conversation.  The textbook used is Et Vous?  The course will cover listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills at a beginning level.  Projects emphasize culture, history, art, performance, and creativity.

French I or French 1A - 7th Grade Priority
The primary goal of this class is to master basic French grammar and vocabulary as a foundation for comprehension and conversation. The textbook used is district-wide adopted Bon Voyage by Glencoe. The course will cover listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills at a beginning level. Projects emphasize culture, art, performance and creativity. The is the first year of a two-year course for which .5 high school credit is available. Passing grades are required to continue to the next year.

French II or French 1B
This course is a continuation of French I. The same textbook is used. Emphasis is on building on the foundations of grammar and vocabulary in French I and on expanding communication skills. Projects emphasize culture, art, performance and creativity. This is the second year of a two-year course for which .5 high school credit is available. Students completing French 1A and 1B with passing grades will be eligible to continue on in high school with French 2A.

Questions about Foreign Language at WMS can be addressed to David Simmons, Subject Matter Specialist at dasimmons@seattleschools.org


Special Education

The Special Education program at Washington provides specially designed instruction to qualified students with Individualized Educational Programs  (IEPs) in the areas of reading, written expression, mathematics, study skills, daily living skills, behavior, speech and language, and occupational therapy. 

These classes present below grade level curriculum with specific attention to developing skills needed for successful re-integration into the general education curriculum.  Classes are determined by the IEP team and may include self-contained, rotation and/or inclusion model services. 

Students may also be in mainstream classes for varying numbers of periods per day.   Speech and OT/PT services are provided for qualifying students who require either articulation and language processing therapy or have physical disabilities or related health needs.


English Language Development (ELD)

The ELD program at Washington provides Content Based Instruction to English Language Learners. The students are assigned to proficiency based grade level classes at the Basic, Intermediate and Advanced levels. Students receive their Reading and Language Arts instruction within the ELD department. These classes present the district adopted INSIDE Language, Literacy and Content curriculum. Specific attention is given to accelerating academic language proficiency. ELL students are in mainstream classes throughout the remainder of their school day.

Questions about ELD can be addressed to Debra Tarpley, datarpley@seattleschools.org or Joanna Forsyth, joforsyth@seattleschools.org

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